Monday, December 8, 2008

The Free World



Montana court affirms right to die for patients

4 comments:

  1. thought this might be of interest:
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/majornews/3689907/Parents-of-rugby-player-in-Dignitas-assisted-suicide-will-not-face-charges.html

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  2. Especially interesting is that the QC, in declining to prosecute, focuses on the fact that it was Daniel's choice to die, and that his parents "implored" him not to.

    The QC's decision not to prosecute is correct, but it seems strange that the parents' kindness made the difference - slightly more cold parents, or more autonomy-respecting parents who failed to "implore" their child not to do it, might have been prosecuted. I don't know if that's right.

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  3. crikey, this week is a suicide news hotspot!
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/politics/3701894/Gordon-Brown-opposed-to-assisted-suicide-ahead-of-controversial-TV-documentary.html

    the entire thing is a whole lot of nonsense. it is taken for granted that it is the business of the leader/government to voice an opinion on the matter, and for laws to exist to prevent people from self-killing (even when diagnosed as mentally healthy!). i am generally very optimistic, but things like this really annoy me.

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  4. Hi again, Steven - I updated my Mark & Julie James post with information (and vague analysis) about recent events.

    Out of professional interest, I have a Google News alert set to "suicide" - so every day seems like suicide news day to me. But yeah, the TV documentary news surprised me.

    My favorite moment in the article is the "media watch" guy claiming that the documentary disturbed him because it might "influence public opinion" on the subject. Um, isn't that kinda what art/literature/documentaries/television/EVERYTHING is supposed to do?

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