Thursday, October 1, 2009

Is High IQ a Treatable Medical Condition?

I have argued for a right to suicide grounded in personal freedom and dignity; I have argued that there is, in addition, no right to forcibly prevent people from committing suicide. My views on this extreme example of patient choice still apply; but what about less extreme solutions to suffering?

The predominant view of medicine seems to be a doctor-controlled, paternalist one. We must all get a doctor's permission to access most drugs; most people apparently do not find this to be a serious intrusion into privacy and dignity. I think a better view of medicine is that of a doctor as a consultant, who assists the patient with medical knowledge and advice, but does not ultimately control the patient's treatment.

What is the purpose of medicine? (Please feel free to answer this below - it's not just rhetorical.) Is it to relieve suffering? To enforce proper behavior? To extend life? Certain definitions of medicine's purpose (like that last one) rely on idiosyncratic values that perhaps should not be forced on others. A fairly radical, but I think value-neutral, definition of the purpose of medicine might be: to assist patients in maximizing their own values by providing knowledge of human biological systems and applying available medical techniques as chosen by the patient.

One of these might be a prescription for Nembutal.

But another of these "available medical techniques" might help a patient reduce his general intelligence in various ways if it is a burden to him.

The DSM-IV definitions of diseases tends to include the rider that the symptoms "cause marked distress" to the patient. Perhaps it is time to consider whether conditions thought to be desirable that "cause marked distress" should also be treatable.

High intelligence is clearly treatable with a variety of substances and treatments, from ECT to antipsychotics to medical cannabis. If, say, extremely good memory or other symptoms of high intelligence are a burden to the patient, shouldn't he be entitled to use available technology to eliminate them? And why not have a physician's advice on how to do it in a manner that maximizes the patient's other values?

Is it different from suicide?
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