Wednesday, March 31, 2010

Society for the Protection of Possible Future People

Adam Ozimek at Modeled Behavior applies the successive-selves metaphysics suggested by neuroscience (examined in detail in, among others, Jennifer Radden's 1996 book Divided Minds and Successive Selves: Ethical Issues in Disorders of Identity and Personality) to the issue of suicide. He argues:
If one seriously considers the future self as a separate self, it seems to me a serious challenge the Szaszian idea that mental illness is just extreme preferences and that suicide should be respected and allowed as a legitimate exercise of choice; if our future selves are separate selves, then suicide is murder. [Emphasis mine.]

TGGP disagrees on the ground that our present selves and future selves have such united interests that they should be thought of as a single entity. Practically speaking, "If suicide is murder, then spending in the present is theft from a future self, sex is rape and a boxing match is battery," says TGGP.

This is certainly the reason that "successive selves" thinking will never catch on, true as it may be. Then we couldn’t lock people up for rapes and murders for long periods of time. (How do you punish a past self?) The entire justification for contract enforcement is destroyed.

But I think there's a deeper reason that the suicide/murder analogy fails. I respond:

My future self is not anything other than a possibility. It’s a possible self. Even accepting the successive-selves view, suicide is no more murder than is abortion or contraception.

There’s a distinction between protecting the "right" of merely possible people to come into existence on the one hand, and protecting the interests of future people provided they come into existence on the other (as we do when we consider, e.g., environmental protection, budget deficits, etc.).

Tuesday, March 23, 2010

Yet More Evidence that Suicide is Adaptive

The more babies you produce, the less likely you are to commit suicide (Reuters: The more kids, the lower moms' suicide risk).

This evidence supports the theory that suicide can be an adaptive behavior - people who commit suicide are people of low reproductive value anyway (i.e., those with few or no children and little likelihood of producing any viable offspring). Suicide may be an effective means of accomplishing one's evolved ends - "make sure your genes live on." When one consumes more than one contributes to one's relatives, one's continued existence is a drain on evolutionary fitness.

Of course, that's not how the study phrases it. Rather, motherhood is seen as having a "protective effect" against suicide - as if suicide were gonorrhea, and motherhood a condom.
Looking at 30 years' worth of data on 1.3 million Taiwanese mothers, [Dr. Chun-Yuh Yang, of Kaohsiung Medical University in Taiwan] found that women with two children were 39 percent less likely than those with one child to commit suicide.

That risk was 60 percent lower among women with three or more children, Yang reports in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Thus the species continues.

(As do I, despite speculation to the contrary.)

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